History

510px-Coat_of_arms_of_Haiti 
The recorded history of Haiti began on December 5, 1492 when the European navigator Christopher Columbus happened upon a large island in the region of the western Atlantic Ocean that later came to be known as the Caribbean Sea. It was inhabited by the Taíno, an Arawakan people, who variously called their island Ayiti, Kiskeya, or Bohio. Columbus promptly claimed the island for the Spanish Crown, and renamed it La Isla Española ("the Spanish Island"), or Hispañola (later Anglicized as Hispaniola).

 

RECOGNITION
While a Florida State Representative, Attorney Yolly Roberson was instrumental in furthering HAHS’ request to have 127 Street in the City of North Miami renamed Haitian-American Historical Society Street.

ACCOMPLISHMENTS
THE HAITIAN MEMORIAL MONUMENT IN SAVANNAH GEORGIA
10 years in the making, HAHS’ first project was to erect the Haitian Monument in Savannah, Georgia in honor of our forefathers, "Les Chasseurs-Volontaires de Saint-Domingue," a platoon of Haitian soldiers who fought for American Independence at the Siege of Savannah in 1779.

It comprises six statues of 7 feet demonstrating battle-ready Freedom Fighters (Les Chasseurs-Volontaires de St. Domingue), including the 12 year old drummer boy Henri Christophe, who became commander of the Haitian army and later King of Haiti.

Work of renowned sculptor James Mastin
www.jamesmastinart.com